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World Athletics President Sebastian Coe Explained His Federation Unflinching Stance On DSD Athletes

Sebastian Coe has open up on the decision his Federation took over athletes with differences in sexual development (DSD), claiming he had sought to keep competitive options open in the female category even though a different alternative may have been open to him.

Speaking in a Sports Law Q&A podcast, Coe told British lawyer Jonathan Taylor: “If I’m being hard-nosed about it, if I’d stuck simply to the definitions around biology then I would probably have got support for preventing those athletes from competing at all in a female category,

“I didn’t want to do that.”

Coe added: “So finding the right level of controllable testosterone over a period that allowed them to compete at those distances was for me absolutely in alignment with every philosophy, every principle that I went into the sport for.

“But then you get the next challenge about human rights.

“I am very acutely conscious of human rights.

“But the question I then ask is whose human rights are we talking about here?

“Are we talking about the millions of girls that enter athletics and want to feel that they are competing at least on a level footing, do I have a concern about them?

“Yes I do.

“But I also wanted to preserve that in a way that didn’t stigmatise and cause hurt to other athletes.

“It was a difficult decision to make.

“The easier decision would frankly have been to have sat there and done nothing at all, which if I’m being honest is where pretty much the most of sport has gone now.

“We have a similar challenge around transgender and our policy there was in large part driven and in alignment with what we have done around DSD.

“So you don’t come into any sport at the level I chose to get elected at and think you are going to make a lot of friends.

“You do have to do what you think is in the best interests of the sport and possibly that judgement is made way beyond the term that you are serving,” he explained.

The World Athletics rules, which went into effect in 2019, cap athlete testosterone levels in women’s events from the 400 metres through the mile for athletes with DSD such as South Africa’s Olympic 800m champion Caster Semenya.

World Athletics said that no female athletes would have a level above the cap – five nanomoles per litre – unless they had a DSD or a tumour, and that in the case of athletes in the DSD category testosterone-suppressing medication would need to be taken in order to bring levels into the agreed range.

Semenya has lost appeals at the Court of Arbitration for Sport and the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland against the World Athletics regulations over the past two years.

But earlier this month the South African Government’s Department of Sport, Arts and Culture pledged R12 million (£576,600/$803,000/€671,500) to help her appeal to the European Court of Human Rights against her testosterone ruling.

By discernsportblog

Former sprinter, Taewondo and Badminton Player. Sport Physiotherapist

One reply on “World Athletics President Sebastian Coe Explained His Federation Unflinching Stance On DSD Athletes”

Good day,

This is an open letter to the World Athletics.
With all due reapect. I am asking for an explanation/s how Testosterone act/react, when innocent girls run in 10 000m race❓
.
The interpretation on Caster Semenya’s case by World Athletics has raised these questions in my mind.

Say she runs a 10 000m race, that means from 0m to 399m her Testosterone acts as a woman. Then from 400m to 1499m it acts as a man. Then from 1500 to 10 000m it changes again and acts as a woman❓.

Can a Testosterone acts/reacts like that in one race❓

Regards
Tsietsi MATHULE (South Africa)

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